FAQs

Blogs (1)

I Would Like a Blog; How Does This Work?

All HSPH Blogs live under the blogs.sph.harvard.edu domain; if you are a faculty member/researcher and would like a blog, please fill out the Blog Request form.

Browsers (1)

Is There A Specific Browser I Should Use For WordPress?

You can use any browser to access WordPress. Please note that you should be using the most current version of your browser.

The most current versions and download links can be found here:

http://www.browsehappy.com/

Faculty (4)

LaTeX Support

WordPress @ HSPH supports LaTeX formula inclusion; please visit this page for information on how to structure your formulas for correct display: LaTeX Formatting.

I’m a member of the Faculty or a Researcher; how do I login?

If you are a faculty or a researcher, you should have received an email containing a username and password and a link to the WordPress login page.

If you have forgotten your password or did not receive the email, click on the “Lost your password?” link and you will be taken to a screen where you can enter your email address and a new password will be emailed to you.

Once you successfully log in you can change your temporary password by hovering over “Howdy, YOUR NAME” in the top right black bar of your site and clicking on “Edit My Profile”.

I’m a member of the Faculty or a Researcher; was my site migrated?

All Faculty and Researcher sites that were on Publisher have been migrated to WordPress. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us!

Faculty or Researchers – How Do I Change My Title or Department?

In order to change your title or department, please contact the Office of Faculty Affairs.

Feature/Change Requests (1)

I Think We’re Missing A Feature; What Do I Need To Do?

If you have a feature or a change idea, please fill out the Feature/Change Request Form. We will evaluate and get back to you as soon as possible with a response.

Please Note: Feature/Change requests are being accepted but will be placed in a holding queue until the HSPH site migration is completed.

Forms (4)

How Do I Embed a Qualtrics Form?

When it comes to Qualtrics forms you can either paste the link to the form into your page or post or for a more seamless look and feel you can embed the form into your page using an iframe.

To embed the form copy and paste the following code into the text editor pane of the page or post:

<iframe src='LINK to your form here' name='Qualtrics' scrolling='auto' frameborder='no' align='center' height='800px' width='100%'>

Once you have done this, change the “LINK to your form here” to the link to your Qualtrics form provided upon publishing your form.

Note: If you have issues embedding a form into your site please contact the webteam as we may need to enable iframes on your site.

WordPress Forms

A contact form is a great way to offer your readers the ability to get in touch, without giving out your personal email address.

Each contact form can easily be customized to fit your needs. When a user submits your contact form you will be emailed and the results added to your feedback management area.

Add a new contact form

You can add contact forms to both posts and pages. Simply click the “Add a custom form” button.

Contact Form Button

Doing so will bring up a screen where you can customize the fields that will be displayed on your contact form.

Once you are happy with your contact form, you’ll want to save it by clicking the blue “Add this form to my post” button.

Doing so will convert your form to shortcode which will be inserted into your post.

contact form shortcode

Once you publish your post, this shortcode will be transformed into a fully functional contact form.

 

Edit an existing contact form

To edit an existing contact form, simply click the small add contact form media icon after you’ve already saved a form. Your existing contact form will be loaded into the editor. Alternatively, you have the option of editing the shortcode yourself instead of using the editor.

 

Add a field

Adding additional fields to your contact field couldn’t be easier. Simply click the “Add a new field” link.

A new field will be added to the bottom of your form, and editing options will be added to the right column.

Label The label field is the description seen on the top of each field (i.e. Name, Email, Website, etc…)

Field Type The field type dropdown allows you to select the type of form element that you would like to use (i.e. textbox, dropdown, radio button, etc.).

Required Clicking the required checkbox will force users to fill out this field before they can submit your contact form. If they skip a required field, they’ll see an alert instructing them to fill out the field before they submit the form.

Options Should you select dropdown, or radio button as a field type, you will be presented with a fourth option that allows you to add select options. Click on the ‘Add another option’ link to add more options.

 

Edit a field

To edit a field, just move your mouse over the field you’d like to edit and click the “edit” link. Once you click this link, you’ll be able to edit the field on the right.

When you’re happy with your changes, click the gray “Save this field” button. Once you are done making changes to your form, click the blue “Add this form to my post” button.

 

Delete a field

To delete a field you’ll want to click the minus sign next to any field.

When working with dropdown or radio options, you can also delete options.

 

Reorder fields

Want to reorganize your fields? No worries, just mouse over the field that you’d like to move. Move your mouse over the “move” link. You’ll see a box that says “Drag up or down to re-arrange”.

Click the “move” link and hold down your left mouse button while you drag the form field to the position you’d like it to be in.

Save your form, by clicking the blue “Add this form to my post” button and you are set.

 

Notification preferences

When a user submits your contact form, it will be emailed to the author of the post/page, and the subject line will be the title of your post. If you wish, you can change both the recipient and the email subject of your emails by clicking the “Email notifications” tab. Separate recipient emails with a comma to send to multiple recipients.

 

Feedback management

You can read all feedback sent through your contact form in your feedback management area. Just click the “Feedbacks” link in your left-hand menu.

You’ll be able to manage your feedback just like you’d manage comments.

 

What Will Happen to My Old Forms?

The question is where did you create your forms? If you created your forms in Publisher, you will eventually have to move them over to Qualtrics for more sophisticated forms or WordPress for simple contact forms. If your forms are outside Publisher, then your access and usage will be uninterrupted until further notice.

How Do I Create New Forms?

You have two choices for creating forms in the new website.

WordPress Forms can handle simple forms: ie simple contact us or send us a message. These are not intended to be used for forms that have more then 4 questions or forms that have large drop-downs or for surveys or data collection. Please use Qualtrics below for that purpose.

Qualtrics should be used for more complex forms; the Qualtrics service is the new Harvard-wide standard. For information and help creating Qualtrics forms please see the Qualtrics menu at the top of this page.

General (17)

LaTeX Support

WordPress @ HSPH supports LaTeX formula inclusion; please visit this page for information on how to structure your formulas for correct display: LaTeX Formatting.

How Do I create a New Site?

Contact the Help Desk, requesting a ticket be opened to the Web Team, subject ‘WP Site Creation’.

Who Designed the New HSPH Look?

The effort behind the new HSPH design was a collaborative process with several different hands and organizations involved; for the detailed overview, you should read Julie Rafferty’s presentation on the subject!

What is WordPress?

WordPress is a Content Management System (or CMS). See here for more information.

I Would Like a Blog; How Does This Work?

All HSPH Blogs live under the blogs.sph.harvard.edu domain; if you are a faculty member/researcher and would like a blog, please fill out the Blog Request form.

I Think We’re Missing A Feature; What Do I Need To Do?

If you have a feature or a change idea, please fill out the Feature/Change Request Form. We will evaluate and get back to you as soon as possible with a response.

Please Note: Feature/Change requests are being accepted but will be placed in a holding queue until the HSPH site migration is completed.

Can I Change the Font Size/Color/Style/Family?

The font and all associated properties (color, weight, style, and family) have been determined and are part of the site-wide design.  Please try to stay consistent with your heading use across pages.

Below is how your styles will appear on the site once the page is published:

Heading 2

Heading 3

Heading 4

Heading 5

Heading 6

Paragraph Text
FYI: There is more spacing between lines with paragraph, it is the default for main content.

What Colors Are Available for My Use?

Please refer to the HSPH Visual Identity Guide: http://web.sph.harvard.edu/visual-identity-guide/ (PIN required)

I Need to Add a Photo to My Site; Where Can I Find a Good One?

The HSPH branding site is an excellent resource for information on photographs and the overall photography strategy. Contact Sam Harp for further information. Assistance with image preparation is available.

Do We Need to Be Concerned with Image Copyright/Releases?

Yes; permission must be obtained to use all images, following relevant copyright laws. OER has suggestions for sites where low-cost stock photography/licensed images can be purchased.

What Other CMS Options Were Considered?

We evaluated a number of options for the new content management system at HSPH. The three considered the closest were: WordPress, Drupal, or expanding the currently used homegrown system CMS (Publisher).

What Are Some Reasons We’re Using WordPress?

  • Easy to use, maintain, and extend.
  • Flexible; we can extend with plugins and custom code.
  • Open Source; very low cost.
  • Widely used; used worldwide, in many multi-millions of web sites.

Was My Site Migrated to WordPress?

Your web site was migrated only if it formerly lived in, and was edited in, Publisher. If you had a custom site, iSite, or other variant of site, it was not brought over. If you have a question about your particular site, please let us know.

If you have one of aforementioned, non-migrated, sites, and would like to bring it over to the new WordPress site, please contact us and we will set up a one-on-one with you to discuss your needs.
Please note that this service involves the creation and set-up of a bare-bones site. At that time, we will train you on how to migrate your content to the new WordPress site.

I Have a Non-Publisher Site and Would Like to Bring It Over to WordPress

If you have a non-migrated (non-Publisher) site, and would like to bring it over to the new WordPress site, please contact us and we will set up a one-on-one with you to discuss your needs; please note that we are delaying these type of migrations until early 2013.

Please note that this service involves the creation and set-up of a bare-bones site. At that time, we will train you on how to migrate your content to the new WordPress site.

Is There A Specific Browser I Should Use For WordPress?

You can use any browser to access WordPress. Please note that you should be using the most current version of your browser.

The most current versions and download links can be found here:

http://www.browsehappy.com/

Tables – What are they for?

Some may have noticed that there is no table button in the visual editor in WordPress. This is deliberate. Tables are intended for tabular data – defined as data that is best presented in rows and columns. So each “record” shares the same “fields”. If you do not have tabular data then it is highly recommended not to use tables in your layouts.

For starters, it’s usually more accessible to people with disabilities and it is incredibly difficult to render tables properly through voice (trying to render a two dimensional entity via a one dimensional medium). It also makes sense not to hard code presentation on your site. If you use tables, you limit yourself, the next time you’ll want to change your site, you’ll have to completely recode all your tables. Whereas if you are just using the visual editor all you need to do is change a line and and presto, your done.

Also, it gives greater flexibility to users coming to your site on alternate medium. Say, someone coming on with a cellphone. If you have a site relying on tables, it’s *really* hard to deliver the site in a different layout targeting small screen. If you only use text and basic formatting it will fit whatever medium a person coming to your site is on and they can quickly find what they are looking for and not have to pan and zoom around trying to understand what is going on.

There are many different ways to lay out a page and present the same data in ways that do not use tables. If you want to have two columns of data side by side for a schedule consider the information from the left column on top of its counterpart on the right and perhaps even making what was to be the first column bold so that it is differentiated from its counterpart data.

Ultimately though, if you need to use tables for what they were designed for and display rows and columns of tabulated data then the paste from Word button is your best friend as it will clean most of Microsoft’s proprietary formatting and give you a clean place to start.

Microsoft Word

Problems

Microsoft Word is a fine word processor for producing documents to be shared or printed, with a wealth of print-based options for indexing, and producing table of contents. As a web publishing tool it is a little less than ideal and produces very messy HTML. The same applies when using OpenOffice, or other word processors.

When text is pasted it initially looks fine:

openoffice-visual

But looking at the HTML code you can see that it is full of additional tagging information.

openoffice-dirty

This could cause issues with the display of the post or page on your blog, and effect the general layout, as well. The same code above can be written a lot more cleanly using the WordPress visual editor:

openoffice-clean

Using Word Cleanly

If you decide that you still want to use Word then you should use the Word cleanup feature to remove all extraneous tags from your text. From the visual editor click on the show kitchen sinkbutton:

kitchen-sink

Then click on the paste Word button:

paste-word

A window will appear where you can insert your Word content.

word-window

When satisfied, you can then click insert and it will clean the content and insert it into your post. Note that all your formatting will be removed so any styles will need to be added in afterward.

Golive (3)

What Web Link/Address Do I Use to Login Now?

You should now use www.hsph.harvard.edu/hsph-admin to login to WordPress. You should use the same username and password that you have used throughout the entire preparation period. If you cannot login you can try the “Lost your password?” link and a new password will be emailed to you or if you are having continued trouble please contact the Help Desk.

Is my old Publisher site available?

Your old web site that was on Publisher is still available for use as a reference only. If you need to access your old website, please use the URL sphweb.sph.harvard.edu/YOURSITENAME.

Do we still use Publisher?

The HSPH Publisher system is no longer used; websites created using Publisher are now only available for reference.

Links (1)

Why Does My WordPress Site have Links to the Old Publisher Site Still?

Sometimes you will see that links in your new WordPress site still go to a page on your old Publisher site. Most of the time that’s ok; everything should ‘snap in’ once we go live and those links will work correctly. If you have more questions, or want to verify your links, please let us know!

Main Menu (2)

How Do I Move Menu Items?

The Menu editor (found under Appearance) lets you move menu items by simple click-and-drag. That is, click and hold on a menu item and then drag it up, down, to the left (to cause the item to not be a sub menu item) or to the right (to be a submenu item).

Creating Multi-level Menus

When planning the structure of your menu, it helps to think of each menu item as a heading in a formal report document. In a formal report, main section headings (Level 1 headings) are the nearest to the left of the page; sub-section headings (Level 2 headings) are indented slightly further to the right; any other subordinate headings (Level 3, 4, etc) within the same section are indented even further to the right.
The WordPress menu editor allows you to create multi-level menus using a simple ‘drag and drop’ interface. Drag menu items up or down to change their order of appearance in the menu. Drag menu items left or right in order to create sub-levels within your menu.

To make one menu item a subordinate of another, you need to position the ‘child’ underneath its ‘parent’ and then drag it slightly to the right.

  1. Position the mouse over the ‘child’ menu item.
  2. Whilst holding the left mouse button, drag it to the right.
  3. Release the mouse button.
  4. Repeat these steps for each sub-menu item.
  5. Click the Save Menu button in the Menu Editor to save your changes.

How Do I Add a Page or Link to the Menu?

From the Dashboard, navigate to the Appearance menu item in the left side nav bar, and then choose Menus.

Once there, you will see a screen with your existing menu items (in a tree display on the right hand side) and several menu item addition boxes on the left side. There are two items you can add to a menu: existing pages (created through the Page editor) or custom items (a link to anything that’s not a page).

Adding Items to a Menu

To add an item top your menu, follow the steps below.

  1. Locate the pane entitled Pages.
  2. Within this pane, select the View All link to bring up a list of all the currently published Pages on your site.
  3. Select the Pages that you want to add by clicking the checkbox next to each Page’s title.
  4. Click the Add to Menu button located at the bottom of this pane to add your selection(s) to the menu that you created in the previous step.
  5. Scroll back to the Menu Editor.
  6. Click the Save Menu button.

Your custom menu has now been saved.

Deleting a Menu Item

To delete a menu item:

  1. Locate the menu item that you want to remove in the menu editor window
  2. Click on the arrow icon in the top right-hand corner of the menu item/box to expand it.
  3. Click on the Remove link. The menu item/box will be immediately removed.
  4. Click the Save Menu button to save your changes.

Customising Menu Items

The Navigation Label
This field specifies the title of the item on your custom menu. This is what your visitors will see when they visit your site/blog.

The Title Attribute
This field specifies the Alternative (‘Alt’) text for the menu item. This text will be displayed when a user’s mouse hovers over a menu item.

  1. Click on the arrow in the top right-hand corner of the menu item to expand it.
  2. Enter the values for the Navigation Label and Title Attribute that you want to assign to the item.
  3. Click the Save Menu button to save your changes.

Your menu items are now added to the menu! If you want to move the items around, please refer to the FAQ Item How Do I Move Menu Items?

Media & The Media Library (6)

What File Types are Supported for the Media Library?

The following file types are supported:

  • MS PowerPoint (PPT, PPTX)
  • MS Excel (XLS, XLSX, CSV)
  • MS Word (DOC, DOCX)
  • PDF (PDF)
  • Other Text (RTF, TXT)
  • XML (XML)
  • Images (JPG, GIF, PNG)
  • Video (MOV, MP4, SWF, FLA)
  • Audio (MP3, SWF, FLA, OGG)

If you have any questions or do not see the filetype you need listed here, please call the Help Desk and open a ticket to the Web Team, with subject ‘WP Filetype Question’.

What is the Maximum File Size Allowed?

We support 10 meg maximum file uploads; if you need more, please contact the Help Desk and open a ticket to the Web Team, subject ‘WP File Upload Size Question’.

How Do I Upload an Image/File?

A file can be almost anything [see supported filetypes for a detailed description]; the Media section of WordPress is where it is stored and accessed.

To upload a file, hover on the Media section in the nav bar on the left side and click on the Add New link, which will take you to the Upload New Media screen. You’ll see a box where you can upload media by clicking the Select Files button. A file window will show up where you can select one or more files. Once selected, click the Open button. That’s it! WordPress will start uploading your selected media. If there are any issues, WP will let you know with a meaningful error message.

[If you have any questions or issues, copy the error message and send it to the Help Desk, requesting a ticket be opened to the Web Team, subject ‘WP File Upload Error Question’]

You can see what the uploaded media has for settings in the library by clicking on the Show link to the right of each piece of uploaded media.

Training Source – Add a New File to the Media Library

Here is additional information/training sources for the Media Library, specifically,adding a file.

Adding a New File to the Media Library
http://codex.wordpress.org/Media_Add_New_SubPane
http://en.support.wordpress.com/media/media-add-new/

 

Training Source – Using the Media Library

Here is additional information/training sources for the Media Library, specifically, using the Media Library.

Using the Media Library
http://codex.wordpress.org/Media_Library_SubPanel

What Are Shortcodes and Why Should I Use Them?

Shortcodes are specialized WordPress snippets that allow you to quickly and easily add different forms of content to your pages on the HSPH website. They allow video, images, and audio, among many other things!

Visit the WordPress Shortcodes page for more information and a complete list of codes.

Media - Audio (1)

How Do I Embed Audio?

It’s very easy to embed audio in a page in WordPress. Use the following code in your content pane in the Page Editor:
http://www.REPLACEWITHYOURAUDIOLINK.com. That’s it! This will make your page display a small audio player to your audio of choice; the visitor will then be able to click ‘Play’ and away they go!

Please Note: according to official WordPress documentation, “If your current browser does not support HTML5 audio for your uploaded format, or Flash Player is not installed, a direct download link will be displayed instead of the player.” (source link)

Media - Calendar (1)

How Do I Embed a Google Calendar?

You can quickly and easily embed a Google Calendar in your page; visit the official WordPress documentation for a complete walk-through.

Please Note: You will need to contact HSPH Webteam before embedding your calendar to enable this feature on your site. Additionally you will need your own (free) Google account to use this service; HSPH does not have a central account.  

Media - Documents (3)

How Do I Embed a PowerPoint Presentation?

With the combination of Microsoft SkyDrive and WordPress, you can now embed a PowerPoint presentation directly in your page!

Please note; you will need to create your own SkyDrive account in order to use this service; there is no central HSPH account.

Go to the official WordPress documentation for a complete walkthrough.

How Do I Embed a Document from Google Docs?

Google Docs provides a wide variety of documents that are Web accessible/friendly. With WordPress, you can embed them in your page! It’s easy; go to the official WordPress documentation for a complete walkthrough.

Please Note: You will need your own (free) Google account to use the Google Docs service; HSPH does not have a central account.

How Do I Embed an Excel Document?

With the combination of Microsoft SkyDrive and WordPress, you can now embed an Excel document directly in your page!

Please note; you will need to create your own SkyDrive account in order to use this service; there is no central HSPH account.

Go to the official WordPress documentation for a complete walkthrough.

Media - Images (5)

How Do I Insert an Image in a Page?

When in the Page editor, you can add/remove images, using the Upload/Insert icon [it looks like this: ]. When you click on this icon, the Media screen will open over your editor screen giving you the opportunity to load media from one of three places: the Upload screen, a specific URL, or from the Library (which consists of media already uploaded).

When you add form the Upload screen, you will have the chance to modify all of the contextual data about the image and choose how the text should align around the image, in addition to the size of the image you want inserted.

When you add from a specific URL, you will need to identify where the image is coming from in addition to all of the contextual data and how text aligns around the image, in addition to the size of the image you want inserted.

When you add from the Library, you will be given a list of media in column form; you will need to click the Show link next to the desired image. At this point, you will have the opportunity to edit the contextual data, choose how the text aligns, and the size of the image you want inserted.

Once the image is inserted, you will see the image in the content editor!

Click here for the official WordPress documentation.

 

Can I Put Images in my Page?

You can put images in two different places on a page. Images can be embedded in the page content (using the Media Library in the Page editor) or an image can be used as the Featured Image, which will display in the top right corner of the page  [NOTE: the featured image is primarily used in the Content Page template].

Further Reading…

SEE-> How Do I Insert an Image in a Page?
SEE-> How Do I Use the Media Library?
SEE-> How Do I Add a Featured Image?

More Information About the Featured Image

• When you insert a Featured Image into a page, please note that WordPress will attempt to resize the image. However, there may be times when the displayed image will not meet your needs. If you come across this situation, please contact the Web Team for assistance.

• The Featured Image will not completely stretch across the page horizontally. Given this, you may wish to redesign your images with the new WordPress system in mind. If you need any assistance with the best dimensions and formatting for your images, please contact the Web Team.

 

Training Source – Inserting an Image/File into a Page

Another source of training for inserting an image or file into a page.

How to Insert an Image or File
http://codex.wordpress.org/Inserting_Images_into_Posts_and_Pages

Topic – Image Optimization

Click here for more information.

Media - Other (1)

How Do I Embed a Google Map?

Google provides the ability to embed a map in your page using a shortcode.

Visit the official WordPress documentation for a complete walkthrough.

Media - Video (1)

How Do I Embed a YouTube Video?

Embedding a YouTube video is very easy. First, get the URL of the video you want to embed; the easiest way to do this is to visit the video in your browser and copy the URL you will see in your browser’s address bar. Then, paste this code into your browser:

[@embed]YOURYOUTUBELINKHERE[/@embed]

NOTE: You will need to remove the @ symbol from the code when you use it!

 

Other Training/Documentation (7)

LaTeX Support

WordPress @ HSPH supports LaTeX formula inclusion; please visit this page for information on how to structure your formulas for correct display: LaTeX Formatting.

Training Source – The Page Editor

You can find more information/training on the Page editor at this location:
http://en.support.wordpress.com/visual-editor/

Training Source – Add a New File to the Media Library

Here is additional information/training sources for the Media Library, specifically,adding a file.

Adding a New File to the Media Library
http://codex.wordpress.org/Media_Add_New_SubPane
http://en.support.wordpress.com/media/media-add-new/

 

Training Source – Using the Media Library

Here is additional information/training sources for the Media Library, specifically, using the Media Library.

Using the Media Library
http://codex.wordpress.org/Media_Library_SubPanel

Training Source – Inserting an Image/File into a Page

Another source of training for inserting an image or file into a page.

How to Insert an Image or File
http://codex.wordpress.org/Inserting_Images_into_Posts_and_Pages

What Other Training Opportunities Are Out There?

If you are interested in more advanced topics in WordPress or want to meet others working with WordPress, there is an very active Greater Boston WordPress community in Boston.  There are monthly meet-ups as well as an outstanding (and nearly free) annual conference called “WordCamp” hosted by Boston University.  At the meet-ups and at WordCamp, there are beginner as well as advanced topics.

Boston WordCamp 2012

http://2012.boston.wordcamp.org/

Boston WordPress Meet Ups
“The Boston WordPress Meetup is a Meetup group for fans of WordPress, the most popular open source blogging engine. Join us once a month to learn more about WordPress and meet other WP fans, including SEO gurus, theme designers, plugin developers, bloggers, and beginners. Traditionally, we meet at the Microsoft New England Research & Development Center for a presentation, Q&A session, and casual networking. When we don’t have a formal event planned, join us for informal social events at nearby restaurants and pubs.
Boston WordPress events are held in the evenings, on the last Monday of every month, unless otherwise noted.”

Web: http://bostonwp.org
Twitter: @bostonwp
Global Hashtag: #bostonwp

How Do I Add a RSS Feed to My Site?

You can easily add an RSS Feed to the sidebar of your site using the RSS Feed sidebar Widget. For more information about how to work with sidebars and widgets. Please read the Sidebar FAQ

Pages & The Page Editor (16)

How Do I Create a Page?

Once logged in to the Dashboard, select the Pages option from the left hand menu. This will open up the Pages module, where you can see a list of all currently existing pages in your site. To create a new page, click the Add New button, which is directly to the right of the Pages title located in the top of the screen.

What is the Parent/Child Relationship all about?

The Parent/Child relationship is how you identify to WordPress where a page falls in the page hierarchy. If you have a segment on your site called ‘About’ and you want to have a page called ‘Who We Are’ be underneath ‘About’ (so that you have an address of hsph.harvard.edu/yoursite/about/who-we-are, you would need to make ‘Who We Are’ be a child of the ‘About’ page. You can choose that from the Page Attributes section on the right hand side of the screen shown when editing a Page.

How Do I add a Featured Image?

Open the editor of the post or page where you want to display a unique custom header image, and locate the Featured Image module in the bottom right corner under Page Attributes. Click Choose a Featured Image.

If you don’t see the Featured Image module on your Add New or Edit Post page, please make sure you’ve selected Featured Image in your Screen Options.

MP6-Featured-Image

You will see an uploading screen identical to that used when inserting an image into a blog post. Follow the on-screen prompts to choose the image from your computer and upload it or choose it from one of the images already in your Media Library.

Once the image has successfully been uploaded, you’ll see one or more images displayed as thumbnails. Click on the one you want to use as a featured image. It will then appear outlined in blue with a checkmark. If desired, you can add a caption and alt text under the Attachment Details area (optional).

Next, click the button Set Featured Image:

MP6-MediaLibrary

Don’t forget to click Update on your post/page to save your changes. Your featured image is now set!

Note: If your featured image doesn’t appear after following the instructions above, please make sure that it meets the size requirements outlined here.

Removing a Featured Image

To remove or change a featured image, simply re-open the post or page editor and click Remove featured image in the Featured Image module. If you remove a featured image, your custom header image will be displayed.

MP6-Featured-Image-2

What is the Page Template?

The Page Template is automatically set at Default Template (also known as the Content Page template); this is the template most commonly used in the school and should be your go-to template. However, there are exceptions:

• If you are a Faculty member or Researcher……use Faculty Researcher Page

If you have any questions about templates, or are wondering if you should use a specific one, please contact the Help Desk and open a Web team ticket with the subject ‘Template Question’.

How Do I Insert an Image in a Page?

When in the Page editor, you can add/remove images, using the Upload/Insert icon [it looks like this: ]. When you click on this icon, the Media screen will open over your editor screen giving you the opportunity to load media from one of three places: the Upload screen, a specific URL, or from the Library (which consists of media already uploaded).

When you add form the Upload screen, you will have the chance to modify all of the contextual data about the image and choose how the text should align around the image, in addition to the size of the image you want inserted.

When you add from a specific URL, you will need to identify where the image is coming from in addition to all of the contextual data and how text aligns around the image, in addition to the size of the image you want inserted.

When you add from the Library, you will be given a list of media in column form; you will need to click the Show link next to the desired image. At this point, you will have the opportunity to edit the contextual data, choose how the text aligns, and the size of the image you want inserted.

Once the image is inserted, you will see the image in the content editor!

Click here for the official WordPress documentation.

 

How Do I Preview My Page?

When you are in the Page editor, working away, you might want to see what your work looks like without having to click the Publish button. Inside the Publish box, there are three buttons: Save Draft, Preview, and Publish. If you click Preview, your current page will load and you can see what everything will look like when published.

How do I set a page to come online at a later date?

When you are in the Page editor, look in the Publish box on the right side of the page. There is an option for Publish time, which is going to show a default value of Publish immediately. To set a future publishing date, click the Edit link, which will then change to show a date setting. Simply choose the date and time you want the page to be published and then click the Publish button when you’re ready. This will then publish the page on the date you have chosen.

Additional information and training can be found here.

Can I Put Images in my Page?

You can put images in two different places on a page. Images can be embedded in the page content (using the Media Library in the Page editor) or an image can be used as the Featured Image, which will display in the top right corner of the page  [NOTE: the featured image is primarily used in the Content Page template].

Further Reading…

SEE-> How Do I Insert an Image in a Page?
SEE-> How Do I Use the Media Library?
SEE-> How Do I Add a Featured Image?

When Does a Page Go ‘Live’ on the Internet?

When you are working on a page, as soon as you click the  Publish button, the page is ‘live’ and accessible on the Internet.

Training Source – The Page Editor

You can find more information/training on the Page editor at this location:
http://en.support.wordpress.com/visual-editor/

Entering a Page Title

When you create a new page, you can set a title. There are no real limitations; however, due to the template structure in place, we ask that you keep it to five words or less. NOTE: that whatever title you set, will be used by WordPress to create the URL for the page.

Can I Restore a Page?

If you have made changes to a Page, published it, and then realized a little later “I didn’t want to do that!”, there is a WP feature called Revisions that will help. This feature saves all previous versions of a page for you and provides an easy to use restore button.

See here for more information.

Microsoft Word and Web Pages

Many people use Microsoft Word to build web pages; however, MS Word will introduce a lot of strange code and formatting into your content behind the scenes. The end result is that you could paste something from Word into the Page editor and things will just not look right! For that reason alone, we strongly recommend that you do not use Word for web page formatting. However, if you still need it for your workflow, WordPress does have a Word copy/paste ‘cleaner'; please see the official WordPress documentation for a complete walk-through.

Topic – Deleted Pages

Click here for more information.

Tables – What are they for?

Some may have noticed that there is no table button in the visual editor in WordPress. This is deliberate. Tables are intended for tabular data – defined as data that is best presented in rows and columns. So each “record” shares the same “fields”. If you do not have tabular data then it is highly recommended not to use tables in your layouts.

For starters, it’s usually more accessible to people with disabilities and it is incredibly difficult to render tables properly through voice (trying to render a two dimensional entity via a one dimensional medium). It also makes sense not to hard code presentation on your site. If you use tables, you limit yourself, the next time you’ll want to change your site, you’ll have to completely recode all your tables. Whereas if you are just using the visual editor all you need to do is change a line and and presto, your done.

Also, it gives greater flexibility to users coming to your site on alternate medium. Say, someone coming on with a cellphone. If you have a site relying on tables, it’s *really* hard to deliver the site in a different layout targeting small screen. If you only use text and basic formatting it will fit whatever medium a person coming to your site is on and they can quickly find what they are looking for and not have to pan and zoom around trying to understand what is going on.

There are many different ways to lay out a page and present the same data in ways that do not use tables. If you want to have two columns of data side by side for a schedule consider the information from the left column on top of its counterpart on the right and perhaps even making what was to be the first column bold so that it is differentiated from its counterpart data.

Ultimately though, if you need to use tables for what they were designed for and display rows and columns of tabulated data then the paste from Word button is your best friend as it will clean most of Microsoft’s proprietary formatting and give you a clean place to start.

Microsoft Word

Problems

Microsoft Word is a fine word processor for producing documents to be shared or printed, with a wealth of print-based options for indexing, and producing table of contents. As a web publishing tool it is a little less than ideal and produces very messy HTML. The same applies when using OpenOffice, or other word processors.

When text is pasted it initially looks fine:

openoffice-visual

But looking at the HTML code you can see that it is full of additional tagging information.

openoffice-dirty

This could cause issues with the display of the post or page on your blog, and effect the general layout, as well. The same code above can be written a lot more cleanly using the WordPress visual editor:

openoffice-clean

Using Word Cleanly

If you decide that you still want to use Word then you should use the Word cleanup feature to remove all extraneous tags from your text. From the visual editor click on the show kitchen sinkbutton:

kitchen-sink

Then click on the paste Word button:

paste-word

A window will appear where you can insert your Word content.

word-window

When satisfied, you can then click insert and it will clean the content and insert it into your post. Note that all your formatting will be removed so any styles will need to be added in afterward.

Plugins (2)

What are Plugins?

WordPress plugins are little sub-programs that add features and functionality to WordPress.

I know of this great plugin; can I/we use it?

All plugins are handled by HSPH Web Team. If there is a particular plugin you want/need, please fill out this plugin request form and we’ll get back to you!

Posts (9)

Publish a New Post

The Post Screen is used to create new posts or edit existing posts. The default post screen (Posts -> Add New) will look similar to the following image:

You will notice in the screenshot that the title of the screen is Add New Post. If you were editing a previous post, the title would be Edit Post, but everything else on the screen is essentially the same.

The screen is broken down into modules, each with their own purpose. The three most important parts of the post screen are the Title of your post, the Editor (where you type your content), and the Publish module.

The Publish module is very important because it’s where you save your posts, publish them, and preview changes. The module will change depending on the status of your post. Here is the default Publish module:

After publishing a post, the module will look like this:

Notice how the Save Draft button has been removed and the Publish button has been replaced with Update.

Other support pages will go into more detail on each of the modules and different areas. See Related in the table of contents area at the top of this page.

See Also:

Edit Posts

To edit or delete a post (whether it’s a draft or has already been published), go to Posts → All Posts in your dashboard: 

Here you’ll see a list of all of your posts. Clicking Edit under the name of a post will take you to the dashboard editor, where you can make changes. To delete a post, click Trash.

See the Edit Posts Screen FAQ page for more details.

Edit Posts Screen

When creating a new post on WordPress.com, you may notice that you have a variety of boxes, also known as “modules”. These modules offer customizable options for publishing your post, such as adding Tags to entry or selecting whether or not comments are allowed on your post.

Editor

The Editor is where you type the content of your post.

Publish

The publish module includes your Post StatusPost Visibility, and when your post was published.

The Post Status shows whether a post is published or unpublished.

  • Published – The post has been published on your blog for all to see.
  • Scheduled – When the post’s timestamp is set in the future for automatic publishing.
  • Pending Review – The post has been submitted by a Contributor. It must be published by an Editor or Administrator before it is visible to blog readers.
  • Draft – An unpublished post. The post will not be visible to readers until the post is published.

Post Title and Permalink URL

The Title and URL of a post are related by default. When you initially type the title of your post, the post slug (used in the permalink/URL) is automatically created.

The post slug is the part of the URL after the date in a post’s URL. When the default post slug is created, all letters will be converted to lowercase, spaces will be exchanged with dashes, and any special characters will be removed.

You can modify the post slug by clicking the Edit button next to it. When you’re finished editing, click OK. After you are done making your changes don’t forget to click the Update button to update the post and save these changes.

This is especially handy if, for example, your page title is very long, but you would like a URL that people can remember more easily.

If your language uses a non-western character set, long post titles can break post slugs. To fix that, shorten the post slug to a single word.

Keep in mind that only the post slug can be changed. You cannot change any other part of the url such as removing the date.

Post Format

From this module you have the ability to select which format you’d like to use for each post. Learn more about formatting options here.

Tags and Categories

Tags and categories allow you to group your posts together and take advantage of our Topics pages to connect with the WordPress.com community. You can learn more about adding tags and categories to your posts here. For more information on the difference between tags and categories, take a look at our Categories vs. Tags support page.

Post Author

The Author module is used to change the author of a post. To change a post’s author, use the dropdown menu to select the new author and click Update or Publish to save the changes.

Excerpt

Some themes support using Excerpts, or summaries, of your post.

Troubleshooting

If you’re missing one of the modules listed above on your New Post or Edit Post page, you may need to enable it in your Screen Options settings.

Post Formats

Post formats allow you to spice up your blog’s news page by making the different types of content you share visually distinct from one another. To see what post formats are currently supported, go to Posts -> Add New in the dashboard and look for the Format module on the right:

To see what the different formats look like, add some content to the editor, select a post format, and click Preview.

Here’s a list of all the post formats that are available:

  • Standard – Your normal, average, everyday blog post. This is the default styling for your theme.
  • Gallery – Usually will show a thumbnail from the blog post, as well as an excerpt of what the gallery is about.
  • Aside – These are brief snippets of text that aren’t quite whole blog posts. Useful for quick thoughts and anecdotes
  • Image — These posts highlight your images
  • Status — Short updates about what you’re doing right now.
  • Quote — These posts highlight your blockquoted text in a bolder way than standard posts do
  • Video — Just like Image posts these posts highlight your videos
  • Audio — Just like Image and Video these posts highlight your Audio attachments
  • Chat – These posts highlight snippets of memorable conversations you have with friends, both online and offline.

Tags and Categories

Tags

Tags provide a useful way to group related posts together and to quickly tell readers what a post is about. Tags also make it easier for people to find your content. Tags are similar to, but more specific than, categories. The use of tags is completely optional.

Tags can be displayed at the top or bottom of posts, on the individual post view, and/or in the sidebar. You can assign multiple tags per post.

Adding Tags via the Tags Module

You can assign and/or add new tags to posts before you publish them using the Post Tags module to the bottom right of the post editor. You can add tags one at a time by clicking the Add button or hitting the Enter/Return key on your keyboard after typing each tag. Or you can add multiple tags at a time by separating them with a comma as you type.

Separate multiple tags with commas

To remove a tag from the post, click the small X icon next to the tag.

Deleting a tag

To choose from your most commonly used tags, click Choose from the most used tags. Then, click on the tags you want to assign to the post.

module-tags1

Categories

Categories provide a helpful way to group related posts together, and to quickly tell readers what a post is about. Categories also make it easier for people to find your content. Categories are similar to, but broader than, tags.

Depending on the theme and widgets you have activated, categories can be displayed at the top or bottom of posts, on the individual post view, and/or in the sidebar. You can assign multiple categories per post (you must assign at least one), and categories can be organized hierarchically.

Adding Categories via the Categories Module

You can assign and/or add new categories to posts before you publish them using the Categories module to the right of the post editor.

 

Select the checkbox next to a category name to add it to a post.

  • If you would like to add a new category to your blog and associate it with the post, click + Add New Category.
  • Click the Most Used tab at the top of the module to select from your already created categories that you use the most.
  • Use the Parent Category drop down menu to nest a category within a category.

The “More” Tag

You can truncate your blog entries so that only the first part of certain posts is displayed on the home and archive pages. When you do this, a link will be placed directly after your excerpt, pointing the reader to the full post.

You can find the More Tag button in the first row of the visual editor toolbar or by pressing Alt+Shift+T:

more_button

Using the More tag

  1. Go to Posts -> Add New in your dashboard to create a new blog entry.
    Note: this does not work with Pages.
  2. Begin writing your post. When you decide that you want to cut it off, insert the More tag to split the post (mark where the excerpt officially ends). You will see the More Tag as such in the visual editor:
    more_post
  3. Finish writing your post.
  4. Publish the post and view the front page of your blog. You should see your post effectively split using the More Tag.
    Note: The more tag is not displayed in post previews, since previews display posts in entirety, but the more tag will appear once the post has been published.

Click on the link, and you will be taken to the post in its full form. The front page of your blog should display the post similar to:

But wait, there’s more!

You can further customize the message that displays in the link to the full post content.

You will need to do this in the HTML view of your editor. Once you have changed to the HTML editor, look for this code:

<!--more-->

Custom Read More Message

To customize the message, simply add a space after <!--more, and turn it into something like this…

<!--more But wait, there's more!-->

The front page of your blog should now display your post as such:

Note: You will need to customize the message for each post. You cannot declare a global message that will take effect on each post of your blog that uses the More Tag.

Formatting Issues

If the More Tag is inserted after writing a post, formatting errors can occur. The issue occurs when you insert the More Tag using the visual editor, but it is actually placed within another HTML tag. As an example:

Oh man, this post is messed up. (more…)

RSS Feeds

A feed is a function of special software that allows feedreaders to access a site, automatically looking for new content and then posting the information about new content and updates to another site. This provides a way for users to keep up with the latest and hottest information posted on different blogging sites.

There are several different kinds of feeds, read by different feedreaders. Some feeds include RSS (alternately defined as “Rich Site Summary” or “Really Simple Syndication”), Atom or RDF files.

WordPress Built-in Feeds

By default, WordPress comes with various feeds. There are times when you want to tell someone your site’s feed address or URL, or you need it to submit it to search engines and directories, many of which now accept feed URL submissions. There are four possible URLs for each of your feeds. Any of these will work.

http://example.com/feed/

http://example.com/feed/rss/


http://example.com/feed/rss2/


http://example.com/feed/rdf/


http://example.com/feed/atom/

Tables – What are they for?

Some may have noticed that there is no table button in the visual editor in WordPress. This is deliberate. Tables are intended for tabular data – defined as data that is best presented in rows and columns. So each “record” shares the same “fields”. If you do not have tabular data then it is highly recommended not to use tables in your layouts.

For starters, it’s usually more accessible to people with disabilities and it is incredibly difficult to render tables properly through voice (trying to render a two dimensional entity via a one dimensional medium). It also makes sense not to hard code presentation on your site. If you use tables, you limit yourself, the next time you’ll want to change your site, you’ll have to completely recode all your tables. Whereas if you are just using the visual editor all you need to do is change a line and and presto, your done.

Also, it gives greater flexibility to users coming to your site on alternate medium. Say, someone coming on with a cellphone. If you have a site relying on tables, it’s *really* hard to deliver the site in a different layout targeting small screen. If you only use text and basic formatting it will fit whatever medium a person coming to your site is on and they can quickly find what they are looking for and not have to pan and zoom around trying to understand what is going on.

There are many different ways to lay out a page and present the same data in ways that do not use tables. If you want to have two columns of data side by side for a schedule consider the information from the left column on top of its counterpart on the right and perhaps even making what was to be the first column bold so that it is differentiated from its counterpart data.

Ultimately though, if you need to use tables for what they were designed for and display rows and columns of tabulated data then the paste from Word button is your best friend as it will clean most of Microsoft’s proprietary formatting and give you a clean place to start.

Microsoft Word

Problems

Microsoft Word is a fine word processor for producing documents to be shared or printed, with a wealth of print-based options for indexing, and producing table of contents. As a web publishing tool it is a little less than ideal and produces very messy HTML. The same applies when using OpenOffice, or other word processors.

When text is pasted it initially looks fine:

openoffice-visual

But looking at the HTML code you can see that it is full of additional tagging information.

openoffice-dirty

This could cause issues with the display of the post or page on your blog, and effect the general layout, as well. The same code above can be written a lot more cleanly using the WordPress visual editor:

openoffice-clean

Using Word Cleanly

If you decide that you still want to use Word then you should use the Word cleanup feature to remove all extraneous tags from your text. From the visual editor click on the show kitchen sinkbutton:

kitchen-sink

Then click on the paste Word button:

paste-word

A window will appear where you can insert your Word content.

word-window

When satisfied, you can then click insert and it will clean the content and insert it into your post. Note that all your formatting will be removed so any styles will need to be added in afterward.

Publishing (23)

How do I set a page to come online at a later date?

When you are in the Page editor, look in the Publish box on the right side of the page. There is an option for Publish time, which is going to show a default value of Publish immediately. To set a future publishing date, click the Edit link, which will then change to show a date setting. Simply choose the date and time you want the page to be published and then click the Publish button when you’re ready. This will then publish the page on the date you have chosen.

Additional information and training can be found here.

Entering a Page Title

When you create a new page, you can set a title. There are no real limitations; however, due to the template structure in place, we ask that you keep it to five words or less. NOTE: that whatever title you set, will be used by WordPress to create the URL for the page.

Notes on Publishing a Page and Content Verification

The Publish section provides information on the current status of the page. The Web Team recommends that you preview changes before you click Update (which appears when you are modifying an existing page) or Publish (which appears when you are creating a new page). You can change the Status of a page at any time by clicking the Edit link next to the current status.

Also note that the last date the page was published (created or modified) is displayed for you.

Other actions you can take in this section is to ‘Move to Trash’, which will put the page in the trash, but will not immediately delete it. This is important, because if you make a mistake and just want to start over, you will need to delete the page from the Trash (can be found in the Pages section.

Can I Restore a Page?

If you have made changes to a Page, published it, and then realized a little later “I didn’t want to do that!”, there is a WP feature called Revisions that will help. This feature saves all previous versions of a page for you and provides an easy to use restore button.

See here for more information.

Microsoft Word and Web Pages

Many people use Microsoft Word to build web pages; however, MS Word will introduce a lot of strange code and formatting into your content behind the scenes. The end result is that you could paste something from Word into the Page editor and things will just not look right! For that reason alone, we strongly recommend that you do not use Word for web page formatting. However, if you still need it for your workflow, WordPress does have a Word copy/paste ‘cleaner'; please see the official WordPress documentation for a complete walk-through.

How Do I Use the Proofreading Function?

WordPress has a built in grammar/syntax/spellcheck proofreader; go to the official WordPress documentation for more information.

Topic – Deleted Pages

Click here for more information.

What Are Shortcodes and Why Should I Use Them?

Shortcodes are specialized WordPress snippets that allow you to quickly and easily add different forms of content to your pages on the HSPH website. They allow video, images, and audio, among many other things!

Visit the WordPress Shortcodes page for more information and a complete list of codes.

What Colors Are Available for My Use?

Please refer to the HSPH Visual Identity Guide: http://web.sph.harvard.edu/visual-identity-guide/ (PIN required)

I Need to Add a Photo to My Site; Where Can I Find a Good One?

The HSPH branding site is an excellent resource for information on photographs and the overall photography strategy. Contact Sam Harp for further information. Assistance with image preparation is available.

Do We Need to Be Concerned with Image Copyright/Releases?

Yes; permission must be obtained to use all images, following relevant copyright laws. OER has suggestions for sites where low-cost stock photography/licensed images can be purchased.

Why Does My WordPress Site have Links to the Old Publisher Site Still?

Sometimes you will see that links in your new WordPress site still go to a page on your old Publisher site. Most of the time that’s ok; everything should ‘snap in’ once we go live and those links will work correctly. If you have more questions, or want to verify your links, please let us know!

Faculty or Researchers – How Do I Change My Title or Department?

In order to change your title or department, please contact the Office of Faculty Affairs.

Publish a New Post

The Post Screen is used to create new posts or edit existing posts. The default post screen (Posts -> Add New) will look similar to the following image:

You will notice in the screenshot that the title of the screen is Add New Post. If you were editing a previous post, the title would be Edit Post, but everything else on the screen is essentially the same.

The screen is broken down into modules, each with their own purpose. The three most important parts of the post screen are the Title of your post, the Editor (where you type your content), and the Publish module.

The Publish module is very important because it’s where you save your posts, publish them, and preview changes. The module will change depending on the status of your post. Here is the default Publish module:

After publishing a post, the module will look like this:

Notice how the Save Draft button has been removed and the Publish button has been replaced with Update.

Other support pages will go into more detail on each of the modules and different areas. See Related in the table of contents area at the top of this page.

See Also:

Edit Posts

To edit or delete a post (whether it’s a draft or has already been published), go to Posts → All Posts in your dashboard: 

Here you’ll see a list of all of your posts. Clicking Edit under the name of a post will take you to the dashboard editor, where you can make changes. To delete a post, click Trash.

See the Edit Posts Screen FAQ page for more details.

Edit Posts Screen

When creating a new post on WordPress.com, you may notice that you have a variety of boxes, also known as “modules”. These modules offer customizable options for publishing your post, such as adding Tags to entry or selecting whether or not comments are allowed on your post.

Editor

The Editor is where you type the content of your post.

Publish

The publish module includes your Post StatusPost Visibility, and when your post was published.

The Post Status shows whether a post is published or unpublished.

  • Published – The post has been published on your blog for all to see.
  • Scheduled – When the post’s timestamp is set in the future for automatic publishing.
  • Pending Review – The post has been submitted by a Contributor. It must be published by an Editor or Administrator before it is visible to blog readers.
  • Draft – An unpublished post. The post will not be visible to readers until the post is published.

Post Title and Permalink URL

The Title and URL of a post are related by default. When you initially type the title of your post, the post slug (used in the permalink/URL) is automatically created.

The post slug is the part of the URL after the date in a post’s URL. When the default post slug is created, all letters will be converted to lowercase, spaces will be exchanged with dashes, and any special characters will be removed.

You can modify the post slug by clicking the Edit button next to it. When you’re finished editing, click OK. After you are done making your changes don’t forget to click the Update button to update the post and save these changes.

This is especially handy if, for example, your page title is very long, but you would like a URL that people can remember more easily.

If your language uses a non-western character set, long post titles can break post slugs. To fix that, shorten the post slug to a single word.

Keep in mind that only the post slug can be changed. You cannot change any other part of the url such as removing the date.

Post Format

From this module you have the ability to select which format you’d like to use for each post. Learn more about formatting options here.

Tags and Categories

Tags and categories allow you to group your posts together and take advantage of our Topics pages to connect with the WordPress.com community. You can learn more about adding tags and categories to your posts here. For more information on the difference between tags and categories, take a look at our Categories vs. Tags support page.

Post Author

The Author module is used to change the author of a post. To change a post’s author, use the dropdown menu to select the new author and click Update or Publish to save the changes.

Excerpt

Some themes support using Excerpts, or summaries, of your post.

Troubleshooting

If you’re missing one of the modules listed above on your New Post or Edit Post page, you may need to enable it in your Screen Options settings.

Post Formats

Post formats allow you to spice up your blog’s news page by making the different types of content you share visually distinct from one another. To see what post formats are currently supported, go to Posts -> Add New in the dashboard and look for the Format module on the right:

To see what the different formats look like, add some content to the editor, select a post format, and click Preview.

Here’s a list of all the post formats that are available:

  • Standard – Your normal, average, everyday blog post. This is the default styling for your theme.
  • Gallery – Usually will show a thumbnail from the blog post, as well as an excerpt of what the gallery is about.
  • Aside – These are brief snippets of text that aren’t quite whole blog posts. Useful for quick thoughts and anecdotes
  • Image — These posts highlight your images
  • Status — Short updates about what you’re doing right now.
  • Quote — These posts highlight your blockquoted text in a bolder way than standard posts do
  • Video — Just like Image posts these posts highlight your videos
  • Audio — Just like Image and Video these posts highlight your Audio attachments
  • Chat – These posts highlight snippets of memorable conversations you have with friends, both online and offline.

Tags and Categories

Tags

Tags provide a useful way to group related posts together and to quickly tell readers what a post is about. Tags also make it easier for people to find your content. Tags are similar to, but more specific than, categories. The use of tags is completely optional.

Tags can be displayed at the top or bottom of posts, on the individual post view, and/or in the sidebar. You can assign multiple tags per post.

Adding Tags via the Tags Module

You can assign and/or add new tags to posts before you publish them using the Post Tags module to the bottom right of the post editor. You can add tags one at a time by clicking the Add button or hitting the Enter/Return key on your keyboard after typing each tag. Or you can add multiple tags at a time by separating them with a comma as you type.

Separate multiple tags with commas

To remove a tag from the post, click the small X icon next to the tag.

Deleting a tag

To choose from your most commonly used tags, click Choose from the most used tags. Then, click on the tags you want to assign to the post.

module-tags1

Categories

Categories provide a helpful way to group related posts together, and to quickly tell readers what a post is about. Categories also make it easier for people to find your content. Categories are similar to, but broader than, tags.

Depending on the theme and widgets you have activated, categories can be displayed at the top or bottom of posts, on the individual post view, and/or in the sidebar. You can assign multiple categories per post (you must assign at least one), and categories can be organized hierarchically.

Adding Categories via the Categories Module

You can assign and/or add new categories to posts before you publish them using the Categories module to the right of the post editor.

 

Select the checkbox next to a category name to add it to a post.

  • If you would like to add a new category to your blog and associate it with the post, click + Add New Category.
  • Click the Most Used tab at the top of the module to select from your already created categories that you use the most.
  • Use the Parent Category drop down menu to nest a category within a category.

The “More” Tag

You can truncate your blog entries so that only the first part of certain posts is displayed on the home and archive pages. When you do this, a link will be placed directly after your excerpt, pointing the reader to the full post.

You can find the More Tag button in the first row of the visual editor toolbar or by pressing Alt+Shift+T:

more_button

Using the More tag

  1. Go to Posts -> Add New in your dashboard to create a new blog entry.
    Note: this does not work with Pages.
  2. Begin writing your post. When you decide that you want to cut it off, insert the More tag to split the post (mark where the excerpt officially ends). You will see the More Tag as such in the visual editor:
    more_post
  3. Finish writing your post.
  4. Publish the post and view the front page of your blog. You should see your post effectively split using the More Tag.
    Note: The more tag is not displayed in post previews, since previews display posts in entirety, but the more tag will appear once the post has been published.

Click on the link, and you will be taken to the post in its full form. The front page of your blog should display the post similar to:

But wait, there’s more!

You can further customize the message that displays in the link to the full post content.

You will need to do this in the HTML view of your editor. Once you have changed to the HTML editor, look for this code:

<!--more-->

Custom Read More Message

To customize the message, simply add a space after <!--more, and turn it into something like this…

<!--more But wait, there's more!-->

The front page of your blog should now display your post as such:

Note: You will need to customize the message for each post. You cannot declare a global message that will take effect on each post of your blog that uses the More Tag.

Formatting Issues

If the More Tag is inserted after writing a post, formatting errors can occur. The issue occurs when you insert the More Tag using the visual editor, but it is actually placed within another HTML tag. As an example:

Oh man, this post is messed up. (more…)

RSS Feeds

A feed is a function of special software that allows feedreaders to access a site, automatically looking for new content and then posting the information about new content and updates to another site. This provides a way for users to keep up with the latest and hottest information posted on different blogging sites.

There are several different kinds of feeds, read by different feedreaders. Some feeds include RSS (alternately defined as “Rich Site Summary” or “Really Simple Syndication”), Atom or RDF files.

WordPress Built-in Feeds

By default, WordPress comes with various feeds. There are times when you want to tell someone your site’s feed address or URL, or you need it to submit it to search engines and directories, many of which now accept feed URL submissions. There are four possible URLs for each of your feeds. Any of these will work.

http://example.com/feed/

http://example.com/feed/rss/


http://example.com/feed/rss2/


http://example.com/feed/rdf/


http://example.com/feed/atom/

Tables – What are they for?

Some may have noticed that there is no table button in the visual editor in WordPress. This is deliberate. Tables are intended for tabular data – defined as data that is best presented in rows and columns. So each “record” shares the same “fields”. If you do not have tabular data then it is highly recommended not to use tables in your layouts.

For starters, it’s usually more accessible to people with disabilities and it is incredibly difficult to render tables properly through voice (trying to render a two dimensional entity via a one dimensional medium). It also makes sense not to hard code presentation on your site. If you use tables, you limit yourself, the next time you’ll want to change your site, you’ll have to completely recode all your tables. Whereas if you are just using the visual editor all you need to do is change a line and and presto, your done.

Also, it gives greater flexibility to users coming to your site on alternate medium. Say, someone coming on with a cellphone. If you have a site relying on tables, it’s *really* hard to deliver the site in a different layout targeting small screen. If you only use text and basic formatting it will fit whatever medium a person coming to your site is on and they can quickly find what they are looking for and not have to pan and zoom around trying to understand what is going on.

There are many different ways to lay out a page and present the same data in ways that do not use tables. If you want to have two columns of data side by side for a schedule consider the information from the left column on top of its counterpart on the right and perhaps even making what was to be the first column bold so that it is differentiated from its counterpart data.

Ultimately though, if you need to use tables for what they were designed for and display rows and columns of tabulated data then the paste from Word button is your best friend as it will clean most of Microsoft’s proprietary formatting and give you a clean place to start.

Microsoft Word

Problems

Microsoft Word is a fine word processor for producing documents to be shared or printed, with a wealth of print-based options for indexing, and producing table of contents. As a web publishing tool it is a little less than ideal and produces very messy HTML. The same applies when using OpenOffice, or other word processors.

When text is pasted it initially looks fine:

openoffice-visual

But looking at the HTML code you can see that it is full of additional tagging information.

openoffice-dirty

This could cause issues with the display of the post or page on your blog, and effect the general layout, as well. The same code above can be written a lot more cleanly using the WordPress visual editor:

openoffice-clean

Using Word Cleanly

If you decide that you still want to use Word then you should use the Word cleanup feature to remove all extraneous tags from your text. From the visual editor click on the show kitchen sinkbutton:

kitchen-sink

Then click on the paste Word button:

paste-word

A window will appear where you can insert your Word content.

word-window

When satisfied, you can then click insert and it will clean the content and insert it into your post. Note that all your formatting will be removed so any styles will need to be added in afterward.

RSS (2)

How Do I Add a RSS Feed to My Site?

You can easily add an RSS Feed to the sidebar of your site using the RSS Feed sidebar Widget. For more information about how to work with sidebars and widgets. Please read the Sidebar FAQ

RSS Feeds

A feed is a function of special software that allows feedreaders to access a site, automatically looking for new content and then posting the information about new content and updates to another site. This provides a way for users to keep up with the latest and hottest information posted on different blogging sites.

There are several different kinds of feeds, read by different feedreaders. Some feeds include RSS (alternately defined as “Rich Site Summary” or “Really Simple Syndication”), Atom or RDF files.

WordPress Built-in Feeds

By default, WordPress comes with various feeds. There are times when you want to tell someone your site’s feed address or URL, or you need it to submit it to search engines and directories, many of which now accept feed URL submissions. There are four possible URLs for each of your feeds. Any of these will work.

http://example.com/feed/

http://example.com/feed/rss/


http://example.com/feed/rss2/


http://example.com/feed/rdf/


http://example.com/feed/atom/

Side Bar (2)

How Do I Add a RSS Feed to My Site?

You can easily add an RSS Feed to the sidebar of your site using the RSS Feed sidebar Widget. For more information about how to work with sidebars and widgets. Please read the Sidebar FAQ

How do I add a sidebar to a Page?

Add a Sidebar

To add a sidebar to all pages on your site just click and drag widgets from the available widgets section to the section titled “Main Sidebar” on the right. The sidebar will appear automatically. If you want to control which widgets appear on certain pages of your site please read below.

Available Widgets

The currently available widgets on the site can be found in the “Available Widgets” box on the widgets page.

An example of some of the widgets you may have available.

We launched with 5 Widget areas that you can use on your site.

  1. A custom menu. This widget is great for a list of links or related items on your site. Create a new menu on the “Appearance->Menus” page and then select it from the list of available menus in the widget.
  2. An RSS Feed. If you have a RSS feed from an external site or a feed you want to include this widget will format it nicely for the sidebar.
  3. A Twitter Feed. For you to display your own personal Twitter feed.
  4. An Image. As it says, select an image and it will be added to the sidebar.
  5. Text. This is by far the most powerful of the widget areas and allows you to add almost any text or HTML. Paragraphs of text, announcements, Google Maps, videos, etc are just some of the things that you can put here.

Widget Visibility

The Widget Visibility module enables you to configure widgets to appear only on certain pages (or be hidden on certain pages) by using the Visibility panel. If you cannot see the widget visibility module, please contact the webteam to have it enabled.

The Visibility button is next to the Save button.

Visibility is controlled by five aspects: page type, category, tag, date, and author. For example, if you wanted the Archives widget to only appear on category archives and error pages, choose“Show” from the first dropdown and then add two rules: “Page is 404 Error Page” and “Category is All Category Pages.”

You can also hide widgets based on the current page. For example, if you don’t want the Archives widget to appear on search results pages, choose “Hide” and “Page is Search Results.”

Each visibility rule is handled separately. There isn’t a way, for example, to only display a widget on posts that are categorized as “Summer” and also tagged with “Picnic.”

Statistics (2)

Can I Track My Site Statistics?

There are two methods for tracking statistics; Google Analytics and WordPress Stats.

WordPress Stats is built directly into the WordPress Dashboard; to enable, please submit a ticket with the Help Desk to the Web Team queue, subject Enabling WordPress Stats. When you submit the ticket, please make sure that you specifiy what site(s) you want enabled.

To enable Google Analytics for your site, please submit a ticket with the Help Desk to the Web Team queue, subject Enabling Google Analytics. When you sbumit the ticket, please make sure that you specifiy what site(s) you want enabled. Please note; GA involves visiting an external dashboard.

For More Information…
WordPress Stats
Google Analytics

How Detailed is WordPress Stats?

WordPress Stats will keep track of…

  • Number of visitors to your page by day/month/year
  • What pages are visited (and which are visited the most)
  • If they visited your site, through a link hosted on someone else’ site